FAQ

Did you fill out the form "1099 misc"? If so, for what purpose? Within the context of work, is it like a contract?
One of the most common reasons you’d receive tax form 1099-MISC is if you are self-employed or did work as an independent contractor during the previous year. The IRS refers to this as “non-employee compensation.”In most circumstances, your clients are required to issue Form 1099-MISC when they pay you $600 or more in any year.As a self employed person you are required to report your self employment income if the amount you receive from all sources totals $400 or more. In this situation, the process of filing your taxes is a little different than a taxpayer who only receives regular employment income reported on a W-2.
What is the 1099 tax form?
The 1099 form is meant for freelancers and independent contractors. If you are working independently for a firm, you are most likely to receive a 1099-form. It declares and reports the exact amount of money you receive from a company in the previous tax year but only as a non-employee.In order to receive a 1099-misc, you need to work as an independent contractor, which means you cannot be directly employed with the company. You choose the projects you want to work on and have complete control over the way you do it. There are several ways of becoming an independent contractor or a freelancer. You can be one of the following:A travel writerA driver for a cab companyAn interior designer, among a plethora of other options.However, if you think you qualify as a freelancer, it would be best to invest in a smart tax software hosting solution such as Lacerte cloud to manage your tax-related tasks professionally and in the least possible time. Just look for a reliable and experienced hosting provider who can host your preferable tax software for you. On the other hand, if you are unsure about how much tax you qualify to pay, seeking advice from a tax professional will take you through the entire process with ease.
How do you know if you need to fill out a 1099 form?
Assuming that you are talking about 1099-MISC.  Note that there are other 1099s.check this post - Form 1099 MISC Rules & RegulationsQuick answer - A Form 1099 MISC must be filed for each person to whom payment is made of:$600 or more for services performed for a trade or business by people not treated as employees,Rent or prizes and awards that are not for service ($600 or more) and royalties ($10 or more),any fishing boat proceeds,gross proceeds of $600, or more paid to an attorney during the year, orWithheld any federal income tax under the backup withholding rules regardless of the amount of the payment, etc.
How much is typically taken out in taxes on a 1099? How do you get it to be less?
For what kind of payments? "1099" covers a lot of ground and a lot of different types of reportable payments, some subject to withholding, some not. I assume that you are referring to compensation paid to a non-employee independent contractor that is reported on a 1099-MISC as "non-employee compensation." If so, the answer is none, so , obviously, it can't be less that zero. If your client/customer is withholding tax anyway from payments made to you as a contractor, you can tell him to stop withholding.In addition, if you want, tell him that he still owes you the amount that was withheld. If he took it upon himself to pay the money that he owed you to someone else, that's his problem -- you shouldn't have to deal with it. Even if it's the IRS. (It's not the same thing as employee withholding, the law specifically relieves the employer of liability to the employee for amounts that are withheld from wages for taxes.) If you feel generous, you could always accept the withholding, and just look at it as being part of your quarterly estimated tax liability -- that could even be advantageous because withholding is considered to have been paid evenly over the course of the year rather than on the date actually paid -- but that's totally up to you.
My employer made me fill out a w-9 he pays me by the hour and with holds taxes from me this isn't legal is it either he needs to have me fill out a w2 or not with hold taxes am I correct about this?
Think of the W-9 as a vehicle between a pay provider or a vendor and an independent contractor. When a W-9 is involved, we typically do not use the terms "employer" or "employee". Rather we use the terms vendor and independent contractor. If you have filled out a W-9, then the person paying for labor sees the worker as an independent contractor, not an employee. In this case you get a 1099-MISC and not a Form W-2 at the end of the year. (People and companies that pay for labor often prefer to pay workers as independent contractors, instead of as employees, because the payor does not have to pay employment taxes or provide other benefits.) If you fail to fill out and provide a completed W-9 when one is requested of you, then the person paying for labor is required to hold back part of the pay to the independent contractor (mandatory back up withholding). However, if you have provided a signed W-9 back to the person paying you, then you are correct, the payor should not be withholding anything (unless you have more than one single status as a worker for this company?) If you have filled out and returned only a W-9 to the person who pays you, and know for sure you have not also filled out a W-4 (to be treated as an employee and later receive a W-2), and you can also produce paycheck stubs that show withholding for Social Security and Medicare, state taxes (FICA, MED, etc.), then you should raise this issue with your tax preparer and ask if you should consider filing a Form SS-8 when you complete your tax return. Better yet, print out and bring a Form SS-8 into work now, and ask to speak with someone in human resources, personnel, or the accounting office at the company about that Form SS-8. An SS-8 form should sufficiently scare the bejesus out of the company. If some foul play is at work here, the concern over a Form SS-8 will make people sit up and pay attention. If it is something else (like some of your work is as an employee and other more independent projects are paid out to contractors instead of employees,) then an SS-8 will still be effective... the person paying for labor will go out of their way to then be as clear as possible in explaining their actions. Two final thoughts: 1) Remember, it does not matter what they are doing or not doing, or whether it is legal or questionable. It only matters what you can demonstrate or prove. If you don't get real, live paychecks or at least a stub or advice of deposit that shows withholding, then it will be difficult for you to demonstrate what has or is happening. 2) Sit with a professional tax preparer this coming tax season - and just pay for the service. If you've never seen or filled out a Form SS-8 before, now is not the time to venture it on your own. I can probably figure out how to change the oil in my car by myself. I go to a mechanic for an oil change for a reason.
How do I file a 1099-MISC form for an independent contractor?
While completing the fillable document, a business entity must use the name, address and Social Security or tax identification number as indicated in your W-9. The individual contractors must report their miscellaneous earnings (from 1099) on a 1040 tax return as well.You can find a lot of information here: http://bit.ly/2Nkf48f
How and when should i calculate and  pay taxes as a contractor in US? 1099 form
David has given a good answer as to the mechanics of paying the tax, and the due dates, but let's focus on figuring out what you have to pay.  You're going to have to do some estimating the first year.... because your taxes are based upon your "net" income:  what your 1099 shows, less your related business expenses. So you need to get some idea of what those will be.  Then, estimating the net income, you have three taxes that are due:  federal income tax and federal self employment tax (paid together as one amorphous estimate payment), and most likely, state income tax.  Since this becomes somewhat of a difficult calculation, it is best that you seek the advice of a CPA or enrolled agent who can lead you through the calculations.  In time, you will be able to do it all yourself, but trying to figure out all the nuances of these taxes from ground zero is just overwhelming for most people.  Get some help!  Yes, it will cost you some money, but it probably will save you some money in the long run.
How many people fill out Form 1099 each year?
There are a few different ways of estimating the numbers and thinking about this question. Data from the most recent years are not available—at least not from a reliable source with rigorous methodology—but here is what I can tell you:The most popular type of 1099 is Form 1099-MISC—the form used to report non-employee income including those for self-employed independent contractors (as well as various other types of “miscellaneous” income)Since 2015, there have been just under 16 million self-employed workers (including incorporated and unincorporated contractor businesses). And the data from the BLS seems to suggest this number has been largely consistent from one year to the next: Table A-9. Selected employment indicatorsNow, the total number of 1099-MISC forms has been inching up each year—along with W-2 form filings—and may have surpassed 100 million filing forms. RE: Evaluating the Growth of the 1099 Workforce But this data only goes to 2014 because, again, it’s hard to find reliable data from recent tax years.In terms of the total number of Form 1099s, you’d have to include Interest and Dividend 1099 forms, real estate and rental income, health and education savings accounts, retirement accounts, etc. I’m sure the total number of all 1099 forms surely ranges in the hundreds of millions.Finally, not everybody who is supposed to get a 1099 form gets one. So if you’re asking about the total number of freelancers, the estimates range from about 7.6 million people who primarily rely on self-employed 1099 income and 53 million people who have some type of supplemental income.If you’re someone who’s responsible for filing Form 1099s to the IRS and payee/recipients, I recommend Advanced Micro Solutions for most small-to-medium accounting service needs. It’s basic but very intuitive and cheap.$79 1099 Software Filer & W2 Software for Small Businesses
Professional athletes earn a salary. They have to pay state and local tax. How are tax returns for professional rodeo athletes treated, since they are paying for entry fees and the earnings are winnings?
Jordon has hit the major points.As a college soccer referee, I am an independent contractor, but can easily referee games in multiple states (NY and New England).  A college only has to issue me a 1099-MISC if they pay me more than $600 in a given year.   However, I am obligated to track all earnings and report them in my federal and home state tax returns.I fill out a Schedule C as part of my income tax.I report all earnings (including cash payments) and separately as part of the form, I report all expenses:travel related, dues (like entry fees in your example of a rodeo person), supplies, physical training requirements, etc. etc. etc.  Now it gets tricky if I do get a bunch of 1099-MISC forms from colleges in states that are not my home state.   If the college deducted state income tax from my payment, then I report that as tax-paid in my state, and it reduces the tax I pay to my state.   If they don't, then I am probably under the minimum for tax payments to that state, and I will report all the income to my home state.   If the earnings are very large in another state, I may have to file a separate state tax form as a non-resident for that state.   Each tax form will use the Federal Schedule C as a starting point (I use TurboTax-Business) and it is easy.    Of course, the cost of the TurboTax-Business can be a deduction on my next year's Schedule  C.   It is always advisable for someone like a professional rodeo person to have a tax accountant assist her/him each year.  A college D-1 basketball referee will have the same issue.  They can easily be paid over $2,000 per game and that would trigger 1099-MISC status at every college at which they officiate.  Federal Schedule C and then a tax form for each state, and use a tax accountant for assistance (which is tax deductible).....
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